How to Make Your Voice Sound Demonic

By Nina Makofsky

Besides being a interesting party game, making your voice sound demonic is useful. It can be a great haunting effect for voice-overs or characters. Demonic voices also sound unique in recorded music, either as background sound or for lyrics. Achieving this effect is relatively simple, once you have the appropriate tools.

Practice your lines in a normal voice. You want to have the rhythm and the pauses choreographed, but be aware that some voice effects tools will alter the speed and distinctions of speech.

Select a tool for modifying your voice. You can use a simple voice and music effects board like the Digitech RP7. Each pedal offers a different effect: reverb, distortion, delay, and modulation or pitch. You can select different pitches at various octaves. The lower ones result in a demonic sound.

Use an online tool. For more varied effects, select a free online audio effects program, such as Audacity (see Resources). Download Audacity and, if you don't have an integrated microphone, attach your microphone. Record your track by clicking "Record." Name your sound file by selecting "Audio Track Name" and filling in a title. Use your mouse to highlight your entire audio track. Click "Edit" and select" Duplicate." You now have a second audio file to which you can add effects.

Add effects by using the Effect menu. The ideal tools for adding a demonic tone to your voice are pitch and echo. You can decrease the pitch by point values. Begin with -1 and select "Preview" to hear the difference in the recorded track. Gradually add echo effects the same way by beginning with a small point value and previewing the track. When you arrive at the perfect combination, go to the File menu to export your file to your desktop.

Achieve the Darth Vader echo chamber effect. For booming base tones with a sinister edge, you do not need any type of electronic equipment. Instead, use hexafluoride gas. Sucking a bit of sulfur hexafluoride gas sends the voice to the opposite register.

Tip

Preview and save your audio tracks frequently so you retain your edited recordings.

Warning

Avoid adding too many effects if you want the words on the track to be discernible.

About the Author

Nina Makofsky has been a professional writer for more than 20 years. She specializes in art, pop culture, education, travel and theater. She currently serves as a Mexican correspondent for "Aishti Magazine," covering everything from folk art to urban trends. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Mills College.