How to Make Your Own Wedding Reception Table Centerpieces

By Angela LaFollette

If you want to add your own personal touch to the tables at your wedding reception, consider making your own centerpieces. Wedding reception centerpieces do not need to be expensive, and a trip to your local craft store should yield any materials you need to design custom pieces. Combine vases, stones and floating candles to create your own centerpiece tailored specifically toward your wedding’s theme. Afterward, reuse your wedding centerpieces in your home, or give them away to your guest as souvenirs.

Select a vase design for your centerpieces. The top of the vase needs to be large enough to accept a floating candle. Before you buy your centerpieces, know the number of reception tables you must decorate, and purchase two or three extra vases in case one breaks.

Clean the vases to ensure that they are free of dirt and debris. You do not want a piece of dirt floating around in a vase while your guests eat.

Fill each vase about a quarter full with glass stones. Choose colors that match your wedding theme, or stick with clear stones.

Pour water into the vases, leaving 1 inch of space at the top.

Place a floating candle in each vase. Match the candles to the color of your stones, or choose candles that accent the wedding decor, such as floating flower candles.

Position each centerpiece on a mirror. The mirrors can be circular or square and need to be slightly larger than the base of the vases.

Place the wedding centerpieces in the center of each reception table. Sprinkle flower petals, plastic wedding rings or extra glass stones around them to add visual interest.

Tip

Float multiple candles in large vases.

Fill the vases with seashells instead of stones.

Sprinkle flower petals on the water’s surface in the vases to float alongside the candles.

Group three vases together for large reception tables.

About the Author

Angela LaFollette holds a Bachelor of Arts in advertising with a minor in political science from Marshall University. LaFollette found her passion for writing during an internship as a reporter for "The West Virginia Standard" in 2007. She has more than six years of writing experience and specializes in topics in garden and pets.