How to Make Your Own Cardstock Hand Fan

By Natasha Lawrence
Cardstock hand fan

When it's hot outside and one needs something to "fan" himself with to cool off, this quick project will do the trick. Secured by a wooden handle and waving back and forth, the pleated design will force air onto one's face for a refreshing and cooling sensation.

Card stock samples

Choose a sheet of card stock and fold it in half lengthwise, creasing the fold by pressing down along the seam.

Pleated card stock

Open the sheet and lay flat. Fold the 8-inch end to the middle of the sheet and press down making a crease. Do the same with the other end as well. Open and lay flat. Fold the 8-inch end in again, but only to meet the first fold. Make a crease. Do the same from that fold in to the middle of the sheet so that four even sized pleats are created. (See image in this step)

Press all the pleats together and fold in half lengthwise. Make a cut about 1/2-inch at the width of the pleats in the center fold. With a hot glue gun, apply glue to 1-inch of the Popsicle stick. Slip it through the paper cut and secure it to the card stock between the pleats. This is the handle to the fan. Apply additional hot glue along the edge of the fan where the Popsicle stick is and press the edges together. Let dry.

Open the fan and apply hot glue along the inside edge of the bottom of the fan from the center, about two inches on either side of the Popsicle stick. Place the other Popsicle stick on the card stock perpendicular to the first Popsicle stick and press to secure. It will keep the fan open to achieve maximum opening with the pleated fan. (See image in Introduction)

Tip

If desired, the cardstock fan can be embellished with ribbons, buttons and images.

Warning

If children are making this project, an adult should handle the hot glue gun.

About the Author

For over 25 years, Natasha Lawrence has written for publications from "Alaska Business Monthly" to "Savannah Magazine" and provided destination content as Florida city editor for Wcities. Her expertise in arts and crafts includes calligraphy, painting, mosaics, jewelry making, paper crafts and home decor, often offering workshops in museums and art centers.