How to Make Wooden Boxes for a Stage Production

By Eric Benac ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Script
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Wood
  • Saw
  • Saw horses
  • Sand paper
  • Drill
  • Screws
Wooden boxes are highly adaptable as stage props.

Making props for a stage production is a complex process that takes a lot of skilled laborers working together to create all the necessary props. Wooden boxes can be used for a variety of purposes in stage productions. They can be used to create chests, simple tables, book shelves and other props. Building a wooden box for a stage production requires understanding the nature and direction of the production as well as basic carpentry skills.

Read the script to get an idea of the type of props you are going to need to make for the production. Examine the props and determine how many of them need to be made out of wooden boxes.

Draw a plan of the type of box you want to make to create your prop. Include the exact length and width of the box as well as include it’s location on the stage. Use this as a guide while you create your boxes.

Use your box plans to draw each of your box sides onto your plywood. Make sure you have six sides, including the top, bottom and all four sides. Draw the sides using your ruler to create straight lines.

Hold down the wood on your saw horses using one hand. Cut out the box sides using your saw. Make sure to cut them slowly to keep your lines straight. Sand the edges to remove splinters.

Hold the top and side edges together along an edge, you may want to enlist a helper if possible. Line up the edges of each side and screw them together, do this for both sides. Add additional screws along the edge, in an even pattern, to make the box sturdy.

Attach the other side of the box to the top using the same method. Hold the box bottom against the two sides so the edges line up. Screw the bottom to the sides in an evenly distributed pattern along the edges.

Hold one of the last two sides to the box, and screw it into place. Repeat with the lat slide, and distribute the screws along each side evenly.

Tip

Always consider the safety of your props before all else. If an actor must stand on the prop, make it as sturdy to handle their weight.

About the Author

Eric Benac began writing professionally in 2001. After working as an editor at Alpena Community College in Michigan and receiving his Associate of Journalism, he received a Bachelor of Science in English and a Master of Arts in writing from Northern Michigan University in Marquette.