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How to Make Soy Beads

By Gretchen Maron

Soy beads are tiny, scented and sometimes colored drops of soy wax that spread their fragrance throughout the room when they are warmed and begin to melt. Heat them in a soy bead warmer, candle warmer or tart warmer. Soy wax contains no petroleum chemicals, and so the fumes and smoke are cleaner and less toxic. Soy wax produces less smoke, as well.

Measure 2 cups of soy pastilles into the clean glass jar.

Add 1 tsp. of essential oil to the beads in the jar: You can use an eyedropper to extract the essential oil from the bottle, or you can use the drop dispenser on the bottle, if it has one.

Add 1 tsp. of candle dye to the beads in the jar; use the eyedropper if the candle dye bottle doesn't easily dispense small amounts of dye.

Roll the contents of the jar gently a few times to spread the dye and fragrance through. Cover the jar, and set it in a cool, dark place to allow the scent and dye to absorb into the soft wax.

Check the jar every day or so, and roll the contents around the inside of the jar. It will take up to two weeks for the scent and the dye to work themselves evenly throughout the beads.

Open the jar and pour out some beads.

If they seem too pale or not scented enough, add another 1/4 tsp. of dye or scent to the jar. If they seem too wet or too dark or too strongly scented, add another 1/2 cup of beads. Roll the contents gently around inside the jar, and let it rest for another day or so, and check again. Repeat this step until the beads are scented and colored to your satisfaction. When you are satisfied with both, the beads are done and are ready to use.

Tip

Store your soy beads in a plastic container with a lid, or in a sealed plastic bag. Keep them in a cool area when not in use or they will melt.

Warning

Soy wax is not edible, although it is a soy product. Skin contact with soy wax can trigger dermatitis; wear gloves when you work with soy wax if you have sensitive skin.

About the Author

Gretchen Maron has written content for journals, websites, newspapers, radio news and newsletters, ranging from the International Horn Society journal "Horn Call" and the Air America Radio website, to non-profit organization websites. A librarian for over 30 years and a professional writer since 1996, she's an experienced, knowledgeable researcher.