How to Make Picture Magnets on the Back of Clear Glass Rocks

By Rachel Terry
Glass rocks such as these can be found in the floral department of craft stores.

It's so nice to have magnets on your refrigerator to hold pictures, coupons, calendars, reminders and everything else you like to keep handy. Many businesses today give out refrigerator magnets because they know you look at your refrigerator several times a day. However, a refrigerator that has been turned into a billboard is not always so pleasant to look at. With minimal supplies and time, you can create your own magnets out of clear glass rocks. The rocks are unobtrusive on your fridge and look nice and clean.

Cover your work surface with newspaper to protect it. Silicone glue can be very difficult to remove from tabletops.

Cut 3/4-inch circles from magazines, photographs or scrapbook paper. You can place one of the glass rocks on top of the picture and trace around it with a pencil. Cut out the picture with scissors and double check to make sure it is the same size as the glass rock.

Place the glass rock flat-side-up on the newspaper. Dip the sponge applicator into the pot of Mod Podge and lightly brush the back of the glass rock until it is completely covered with Modge Podge.

Place the paper picture face down on the Mod Podged surface. You can wiggle the picture around a little if you need to center it, but don't adjust it too much or the picture could tear. Allow the Mod Podge to dry completely.

Apply a lentil-sized dab of silicone glue to the paper-backed flat side of the rock. A toothpick is a good applicator for the silicone glue. Smear the silicone glue around until it covers the flat side of the rock. Place the magnet on the silicone glue and press it firmly to create an even surface.

Tip

Make a set of six or eight magnets to give as a gift. Put the magnets in a candy or mint tin before gift-wrapping.

Warning

Keep the lid on the silicone glue because the fumes can be noxious.

About the Author

Rachel Terry has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Brigham Young University. She has been a freelance writer since 1998, authoring literary study guides, as well as articles and essays.