How to Make Candles Out of Wine Bottles

By Greyson Ferguson

Making a candle from a wine bottle can come in handy when no actual candle holders are available. A wine bottle adds a touch of elegance and romance to any room, and the flicker of the flame from behind the colored glass is an excellent conversation piece. Best of all, the process of making one is quite simple and offers a fun way to spend an afternoon.

Find a small bottle of wine with a wide mouth. That way, it will be easier to light the wick once it has dropped further down into the bottle.

Place the empty wine bottle into a sink filled with warm water and allow it to soak overnight. This will allow the label to be removed easily. Skip this step if you would rather keep the label on the glass.

Remove the bottle from the water and allow it ample time to dry.

Feed the candlewick through the mouth of the bottle until it touches the bottom. Tape the top of the wick to the outside of the bottle. This will keep it from falling down.

Boil water in a large pot on the stove. Take the paraffin wax you have and place it into a large, empty can such as a coffee can. Place the can in the boiling water. Make sure that the water does not spill over into the can. You can do this safely by only boiling a few inches of water. With a large enough can, you should have plenty of room between the boiling water and the open can lid. The weight of the can will prevent it from tipping over while the heat from the water circulates through the metal and melts the wax into liquid.

Pour the melted max into the wine bottle. Hold the coffee can with oven mitts to keep your hands from burning. Fill it up close to the top. Allow several hours for the wax to dry. Even if the very top is dry, the rest of the wax may not be. It is best to leave it overnight. Once dry, it will be ready for use.

About the Author

Greyson Ferguson is a graduate of the Savannah College of Art and Design with a degree in film and television. He currently resides in Lansing, Michigan where he works on independent film projects and writes for numerous publications. Ferguson primarily focuses on computer and electronic articles. Greyson produces TheDailyUpbeat.com, focusing on only upbeat news stories with daily updates.