x

How to Make a Wind Spinner Out of a 2 Liter Soda Bottle

You don't have to spend a lot of money to spend an afternoon creating wind spinners at home with your kids. With a couple of everyday items (and a few inexpensive finishing touches), you can entertain your brood while creating a cluster of creative party decorations, or something to add life to your front porch or a tree in your yard.

Use the included variation on this project in the resources below for a more elegant wind spinner project, suitable for adults and teens.

Wash the inside of your bottle with warm soapy water and rinse it with warm water. Turn it upside down to dry.

Wind electrical or masking tape around the bottle diagonally, beginning about 1/5 of the way from the top of the bottle. Repeat 6 more times. If necessary, color the rows of tape using the permanent markers according to your tastes or the theme of your event.

Wrap the measuring tape around the bottle at the top of the first row of tape. Make a mark at each 3/4 inch segment with your pencil.

Slowly make cuts diagonally on the 3/4 inch marks to 2 inches from the bottom of the bottle.

Grab the top of the bottle and gently press downward. With the loops that have formed, pinch each center point to make a crisp crease.

Bend each strip from the very top, 45 degrees to the right so the row appears to be leaning. Repeat the same process at the bottom going in the opposite direction. This will catch the wind and make your creation spin.

Punch a hole in the cap for hanging. Loop a paper clip through the small end of the ball bearing swivel. Make two twists in the paper clip to make a loop, then put it through the top of the bottle cap. Open it once inside in a V-shape to secure it in place.

Loop your string through the larger eye of the ball bearing swivel and hang it from a tree branch or a hook on your front porch.

Tip

Remove the soda bottle label, using an adhesive remover if you wish. If not, no need to worry, it will get covered up later.

Warning

Because a utility knife and lighter are required for this project, it may be best for older kids, or feel free to assist your child during these steps.

About the Author

Tricia Chaves began her writing career after working in advertising and promotions for entertainment publisher "The New Times." In 2005, she earned her real-estate salesperson license from the state of Ohio and certification for leasing and property management from the Northeast Ohio Apartment Association. She was certified as a life and weight-loss coach and master practitioner of neuro-linguistic programming in 2011.