How to Make a Pig Out of a Propane Bottle

By Tonja Steele ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Propane tank
  • 2- or 3-inch pipe
  • Scrap metal
  • Soldering iron
  • Solder
With a little creativity, you can transform a propane tank into a pig.

One man's trash can be another man's treasure. You can easily transform any rusted old propane tank into a garden pig using scrap metal and some imagination. With just a few items, you can have the neighbors talking and heads turning.

Look for a propane tank at a scrap metal yard if you don't have one already. You'll need some additional metal pieces to complete your pig, including 24 inches of matching 2- or 3-inch round pipe.

Cut each pipe into 6 inch pieces and solder to the bottom of the propane tank. Space the pipes so they appear to be the pig's legs. Make sure the bubble on the back of the propane tank is right side up. This will serve as the pig's head.

Use scrap metal such as large bolts, screws or small pipe for the eyes and nose. Attach two eyes and a nose to the front of the tank.

Use scrap metal to make the ears. Cut one oval 6 inches wide and 3 inches deep. Slice the oval in half, heat the metal and bend slightly. Attach the ears to the front of the propane tank, making sure they have a slight concave shape.

To use the pig as a garden planter, cut a rectangular opening in the top of the propane tank roughly 20 inches long and 14 inches wide. Add several small holes in the bottom of the tank to improve drainage, then fill with rock, soil and flowers.

Tip

Get creative with your project. You can add wings to your pig, or paint the body using paint designed for metal. The art in your yard should reflect your personality and creativity.

Warning

If you are not skilled in soldering, consider asking the local high-school vocational instructor if one of his students could make the project for you. Never attempt to operate a soldering device without supervision and proper training.

About the Author

Based in Las Vegas, Tonja Steele has been writing since 1999. Her work has appeared in "Kansas Magazine," as well as several books. She holds a B.A. in marketing and an M.B.A. from Fort Hays State University.