How to Make a Guitar Out of a Cereal Box

By Robert Gray
You can make a guitar from a cereal box.

Interest your young child in a musical instrument early in life by making a homemade guitar together. A simple parent-child craft project that allows your child to exercise his creativity, a homemade guitar will offer hours of fun, imaginative play. Take the opportunity to talk about the different genres of music and combine it with a lesson on recycling. Go around the house with your child searching out other recyclables that can be converted into musical instruments such as an empty round oatmeal box that can be used as a drum.

Tape shut the open end of an empty cereal box permanently using clear tape. Lay it front side up on a work table with the long end parallel to the bottom edge of the table.

Trace a circle in the center of the box. Center a pot lid of the appropriate size on the top face of the box. Keep at least 2-inches of cardboard above and below the lid.

Cut out the circle along the pencil line. First pierce the center of the cardboard circle with the sharp tip of the scissors. Thread the tip of the scissors into the puncture hole in the cardboard and start cutting.

Take three large rubber bands and slip them over the box. Run them from the taped top end of the cereal box to the bottom end. Evenly space them over the round hole in the box.

Increase the tension on the rubber bands by slipping a pencil under the three rubber bands towards the bottom end of the cereal box.

Tape a gift wrapping cardboard tube to the taped end of the box with duct tape. Using 3-inch long duct tape strips, work all the way around the cardboard tube until it is securely attached to the cereal box.

Tip

Allow your child to decorate the guitar with stickers. If a single rubber band isn't long enough to go all around the box, cut two and knot them together. Place the knots at the back of the cereal box. If the cardboard tube is too long, cut it shorter.

Warning

Make sure the pencil slipped under the rubber bands isn't sharp. Keep sharp scissors away from young children.

About the Author

Robert Gray has been writing full time since 1995. His first photography book took seven years to research and publish. He specializes in writing on photography and the arts. He's written for Photography Magazine, Large Format Camera Magazine and many online art and photography websites and blogs.