How to Make a Battering Ram From Cardboard

By Heather Mckinney
Use cardboard to make your own battering ram.

The battering ram goes all the way back to ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. It is simply a heavy pole used to break down doors and barriers. Early battering rams consisted of a felled tree trunk that was carried by many troops and swung by hand. Today, law enforcement uses a metal two-person version to break down doors when necessary. You can make a battering ram out of cardboard for prop or model use. It just takes a few common items to construct one in whatever style you choose.

Cardboard Frame

Cut several squares of cardboard to assemble together.

Take each cardboard square, roll it into a cylinder and staple the ends together. Then staple the cylinders together end-to-end to create the desired length.

Use wadded newspaper or scraps of cardboard to fill the tube. This reinforces your battering ram and keeps it from bending easily.

Cut one smaller square of cardboard. This smaller square will make the head of your battering ram. Use white glue to attach it to the end of the tube.

Outer Layer

Mix equal parts of white glue and water to make your paste.

Cut strips of newspaper that are approximately 1 inch wide and 6 inches long.

Dip the strips into your paste mixture and stick them to the battering ram, including the head. Do at least four layers of strips and let the paste dry completely.

Use acrylic, tempura or spray paint, depending on the look you are going for. Once the paint dries, your battering ram is ready.

Tip

There are many variations you can use to customize your battering ram. If you want a modern police-style version, use flat black paint to finish it off. Create a medieval style battering ram by covering the head in foil and using brown acrylic paint. You can also make metal bands to go on it from the foil.

Another variation is to create a pointed head on the battering ram. Do this by taking the original cardboard square and bending it into a cone. Staple the edges together and cover it in foil before gluing it to the tube.

About the Author

Heather Mckinney has been writing for over 23 years. She has a published piece in the University Archives detailing the history of an independently owned student newspaper. Mckinney holds a Bachelor of Arts in history from University of Texas at San Antonio.