How to Get Recording Artists to Sing Your Song

By Nate Combs ; Updated September 15, 2017
Songwriting can be lyrics alone and does not need to include music.

Getting into the music industry is not an easy task; however, with patience, persistence and a proper knowledge of the business, you can get your music to the appropriate people. It is hard work and will not be likely to come exactly how or even when you expect it to, but if you really want to be a song writer, you will do whatever it takes to make it happen. Once you begin to taste success, you will find that your effort is worth it, and you will feel the rewarding satisfaction of finally being heard.

Prepare yourself. Make sure you edit the lyrics well before giving them to anyone else, and make sure you can play your song perfectly if you have music that accompanies it. In addition, find a local producer that can give you the highest possible quality in your recording. If a song does not sound professional, it will not be a likely candidate for consideration.

Make as many friends and meet as many people as possible, both in and out of the industry. This area can be a problem for many musicians, as they may think they are the best person to ever write a song and wish to get ahead of everyone else. However, other people may have contacts that you would never have guessed they had, and attending local events will help you to socialize and be recognized. Even if others succeed before you, congratulate them and keep friendships strong. They might choose to remember you as they gain fame.

Promote yourself constantly. Join social media networks, websites and organizations to post what you have written and share it with those that have similar interests. Not only will this provide you additional contacts, but agents constantly search these mediums for new talent.

Attend concerts and shows of people you wish to have sing your song. Try to get backstage or introduce yourself to them at a hotel and ask them if you can have their manager's information. Most musicians will not help you out directly because they can get into legal trouble.

Enter contests. There are several contests held throughout each year, many of which are online, and they can be joined for low entrance fees. Most of these contests are judged by the professionals themselves and will, at the very least, make them aware that you are active and pursuing music.

Send your work to major companies and their affiliates. It may not do much, as many top-end companies will refuse work from people they do not recognize, but it is good to keep your options open. Plus, companies affiliated with big labels are more likely to work with you.

Get an agent and an entertainment lawyer. Music companies will accept your music if it is recommended from someone who is well-established in the business already. Agents are much more accessible than these companies, and will work diligently so that both of you can be paid. Lawyers are accessible as well, but they charge up-front fees for their services.

Be consistent and write often. The one song that you have in mind to get to a recording artist is most likely not the song that will make you famous. If you write a song a day or a song a week and promote them all, you have at least 50 more chances to give the industry exactly what they are looking for. Your favorite song is much more likely to be accepted if you get a catchy song accepted first.

Work on small projects and donate your time or services. This will help you build a solid portfolio or demo reel, especially because you want recording artists to perform your songs instead of yourself. If producers can see that you have already written a successful song for an aspiring or semi-professional singer, you can easily move to the top of their lists of songwriters to pass along to the stars.

Tip

Some artists will let you directly contact them to record one of your songs for a hefty price.

About the Author

Nate Combs writes in both English and Spanish, obtained a real-estate license and is a certified translator. He has worked as a professional in music and production for more than five years and is an expert at adventure, role-playing, fighting, action and many other types of video games. Combs holds a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish from University of Central Florida.