How to Crochet a Plus Size Shrug

By Sidney Johns

Things Needed

  • Measuring tape
  • Shrug pattern
  • Crochet needle
  • Thread
  • Calculator
The individual stitch is a factor in size for crocheting.

Understanding how to increase a crochet pattern size opens up the creative possibilities. For some plus size ladies, creating a simple shrug with a crochet needle and thread is difficult. Patterns are not always conducive to ladies of a grander size. With a little extra knowledge, these patterns once too small become viable options for use.

Measure the intended person for the project. Measure across the upper body where the shrug will lay. Measure width and height. Write it down.

Read the intended shrug pattern and identify the longest chain and stitch type. This will be the widest part of the shrug.

Crochet the widest part of the pattern following the directions and measure the height and width. Make a note of how many stitches make one inch. Record the height of each stitch.

Calculate the number of needed stitches to make up the difference between the pattern and the needed size. For instance, if four stitches equal 1 inch, and the pattern is short 20 inches, you will need to add 80 more stitches.

Calculate the extra height of the project. If the intended project is 70 inches in height and 90 inches are needed, you are 20 inches short. If each row is 1 inch high, you will need to add 20 rows to the height.

Tip

Shrug patterns often reduce in width size with each row. To add more rows, double up on the number of intended length rows. For example, if only one row is to have 60 single crochets and two rows are to have 55, create two or three rows of 60 and four or five rows of 55 depending on how many extra rows are needed.

Warning

Not all patterns of shrugs can be enlarged. Extra patterns will distort woven patterns and decorations.

About the Author

Sidney Johns began her writing career in 1993 after moving to Florida. The former teacher and surgical technician worked in the home improvement industry prior to earning a Bachelor of Science in education from Indiana University. While on hiatus in 2004, Johns studied holistic healing and organic growth and gardening.