How to Create Art With Words in Tree Shapes

By Bill Brown ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Pencil
  • Paper

If you want to add words to your artwork using trees, it can be accomplished. Trees are very rich and complicated forms. You can use the structure of the branches to form the letters of your words. The key to drawing a successful tree is to keep in mind the basic form, which is small branches coming from larger ones, upward and outward, usually in asymmetrical fashion. Starting from the basic shape of tree--and moving to the specific branches--you can incorporate the shapes of your letters or forms as you go. In doing so, they can merge seamlessly. Working in pencil on paper gives you the most control.

Mark spots equidistant on your page. Use one mark for each letter in your word. You will be placing one word in each tree for this exercise.

Draw two lines. These lines should be vertical and mostly parallel. Place one line on either side of each series of marks. This is the beginning of the trunk for each tree.

Sketch the broad outlines of the entire tree in a broad shape with a light line. The shape should start about halfway up the trunk and rise above it. Use this as boundary for your branches. Choose a triangular or oval shape, depending on the type of tree you would like to see.

Draw the largest branches coming off the trunk; they should be angling upward.

Work in the letters as you are drawing the larger branches. Use angled branches for the lines of the letters, such as "A" or "N." You can improvise and distort the letters somewhat to fit them in. If you want more realism, distort the letters more; if you want the letters clearer, draw them normally and work the branches into them. This will look less natural, but the word will be more legible.

Finish by drawing the smaller branches and adding detail such as foliage. The smaller branches will repeat the pattern and angle of the larger branches, but they will follow a smaller scale.

About the Author

Bill Brown has been a freelance writer for more than 14 years. Focusing on trade journals covering construction and home topics, his work appears in online and print publications. Brown holds a Master of Arts in liberal arts from St. John's University and is currently based in Houston.