How to Apply Makeup for a Dance Recital

By Contributor
Apply Makeup for a Dance Recital

How to Apply Makeup for a Dance Recital. Practicing all year long and wearing a sequined dance costume aren't all that's needed to be a hit at the annual dance recital. Bright stage lights and large auditoriums make it necessary to apply makeup for a dance recital. If you're an aspiring performer or the parent of one, learn how to apply makeup for a dance recital correctly.

Buying Recital Makeup

Check with the dance studio your child attends before buying your stage makeup. Some studios require dancers to wear specific makeup colors and brands.

Make a list of the makeup you'll need to buy. Some dance studios require lipstick and blush but make eye shadow and eyeliner optional.

Do a makeup test run before the big day to make sure you've bought the right products and colors.

Applying Eye Makeup

Put a neutral-colored eye shadow such as tan on each eyelid and right underneath each eyebrow. Add a darker color eye shadow such as cocoa to the space in between. Blend both colors.

Apply black eyeliner to both the top and bottom eyelids. Extend the eyeliner about a 1/2 inch beyond the outer corner of each eye. This helps the eyes appear larger.

Apply two coats of black mascara after applying eye shadow and eyeliner.

Applying Foundation and Lipstick

Use a darker shade of liquid foundation than you normally would choose for your child's skin tone. This might look weird up close, but keep in mind that audience members are far from the stage, and the stage lights make everyone very pale. Apply powder foundation over the liquid foundation to finish the look.

Trace both the upper and bottom lips with the red lip liner. Fill in the top lip with a long-wearing bright red lipstick, and then have your child rub her lips together to blend the lip color onto the bottom lip.

Tell your child to avoid all beverages other than water before going on stage to preserve her lip color.

Tip

Avoid using blue eye shadow. It'll make your child looked "washed out" when under the stage lights.