Dritz Easy Hem Instructions

By Andrea Lott Haney ; Updated September 15, 2017

Dritz, a division of Prym Consumer, USA, Inc. manufactures hundreds of notions items under several different brand names, including the Ezy-Hem gauge. The Dritz Ezy-Hem gauge decreases prep time when hemming a project with a straight or curved edge by providing the sewer with a moveable template for the precise hem size. Press up the hem using the Dritz Ezy-Hem for a uniform hem ready for stitching and save yourself the time taken to measure around the entire hem, mark and pin.

Straight Hems

When your project requires a straight hem between 1/4 inch and 4 inches deep, use the Dritz Ezy-Hem straight edge for a crisp professional look. Place the hem gauge along the unfinished edge of the fabric. Fold the fabric around the Dritz Ezy-Hem so that the unfinished edge is even with the mark on the gauge of the desired depth of the hem. Press the hem in place. The Dritz Ezy-Hem is made of metal, so when you iron the hem up around the gauge, it will get hot. Avoid burning yourself by removing it carefully using a potholder or cloth after pressing.

Create a narrow hem by folding the unfinished edge over the Dritz Ezy-Hem gauge to half the depth of the desired finished hem. Press in place all the way around the hem. Replace the easy hem device into the folded up hem and fold up again around the Ezy-Hem and press. Stitch the finished hem as pressed.

Curved Hems

Baste the end of the curved hem using a long stitch. Do not trim loose threads on the ends or backstitch to secure them. When creating a curved hem, use the basting threads in the unfinished edge to help ease the fabric around the curve. Pull gently on the loose ends until the fabric gathers slightly. Place the curved edge of the Dritz Ezy-hem at the unfinished edge of the fabric and fold it up to the desired hem depth. Ease the basting threads as necessary around the perimeter of project to create a uniform curve. Press in place. Remove carefully while protecting skin from burns and use an overlock stitch to secure and finish the hem in one step.

About the Author

Andrea Lott Haney writes articles and training materials for food industry publications. Having studied foodservice sanitation, nutrition and menu planning at Purdue University, Lott Haney has more than 10 years of experience as a catering and event planner for luxury hotels and currently tours the Midwest as a corporate customer service trainer and consultant.