Ways to Seal Envelopes

By Jessica Purchiaroni
You can seal envelopes in several creative ways.

Sealing envelopes is no big deal when you are doing something basic like paying off a couple of bills, but when you have a big mailing to take care of, such as invitations or thank-you notes, the task can seem much more tedious. Licking all the seals is probably not the best option. Fortunately, there are a number of alternative and effective ways to keep your envelopes secured.

Seal With a Sponge

Use a kitchen sponge as a cheap alternative to licking envelopes closed.

Cut a small strip off of a new kitchen sponge; a piece about 2 inches wide will do. Dab the sponge in a little water and use it to moisten the seals. Be careful that the sponge does not get too soggy or your envelopes will too.

AquaDoodle Pen

Turn to your child’s toy box for help sealing envelopes. The AquaDoodle pen works like a charm. The pen fills with water and has a sponge-type tip. Use this to moisten the seals. You don't need to buy a whole AquaDoodle set. Many retailers sell the pen separately.

Envelope Seals

Use sticker seals to keep your envelopes closed. Order the seals from stationery websites or your local printing shop. The seals come in a wide variety of designs and colors and can add much character to your envelopes. You can also purchase plain circle seals from an office supply store and create and print your own design.

Homemade Wax Seal

Make a wax seal for an extra-special touch. This is particularly appropriate for wedding invitations or mailings regarding elegant affairs. It does require some skill and patience, however. You can purchase sealing wax in a color you like, as well as a seal design, at your local craft store or online. In most cases, you will also need a glue gun. Closely follow the instructions that come with the sealing wax.

About the Author

Living in Syracuse, New York, Jessica Purchiaroni has been producing local television news since 2006. She is responsible for creating interesting newscasts daily. Her shows were honored with Associated Press awards in 2009 and 2010. Jessica holds a bachelor's degree in broadcast journalism from the SI Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University.