How to Use Peach Wood for Firewood

By Nicole Thelin
Use seasoned wood for your fireplace insert.

Peach wood burns like a hardwood, which burn longer and cleaner than other types of firewood. Peach wood also has a delicious, sweet aroma when burning which makes it ideal for smoking meats as well as for warming homes in the winter. As with any other wood, it burns best when properly seasoned and prepared. Because of its dense nature, peach wood should be added after a fire has been ignited with softwood or kindling.

Cut peach wood into acceptable size pieces for firewood.

Stack the wood on a platform above the ground in a warm, covered area with good air flow for 12 months or longer. This is called ‘seasoning’ the wood and is mandatory for producing quality firewood because it lowers the moisture content of the wood. Green wood, which has not been seasoned, has high water content and should not be burned.

Start the fire with softwoods or kindling for 30 minutes or so.

Add peach wood logs to the fire after it is sufficiently hot. Arrange the logs so that they are close together but do not prevent air circulation within the fire.

Things Needed

  • Peach wood
  • Axe
  • Pallet or elevated platform
  • Storage area
  • Fireplace or fire pit
  • Kindling

Tip

Speed up the seasoning process by cutting the wood into smaller pieces. They will dry faster than larger pieces. Also, loosely stack the pieces to allow more air flow. Store the wood in a covered area with sides open, so that the wood has direct contact with sunlight and wind. Cover the sides in wet conditions. Regularly evaluate the seasoned wood. Seasoned wood will have cracks in the ends and be a duller color than fresh-cut green wood. It will lose its bark and most of its smell. Properly seasoned wood should not have any signs of mold.

Warning

Only burn seasoned wood. If cutting the wood fresh, do not skip Step 2. If purchasing the wood, evaluate it for signs of seasoning before burning.

About the Author

Nicole Thelin has more than a decade of professional writing experience. She has contributed to newspapers such as the "Daily Herald" of Provo, Utah, and now writes for several online publications. Thelin is pursuing a bachelor's degree in education from Western Governors University.