Things to Do With Silly Putty

By Alicia Bodine
Silly Putty

Silly Putty was first invented by James Wright in 1943. The first batch was made by mixing boric acid with silicone oil. Today, there are several other ingredients added, including coloring so that children can purchase Silly Putty in the color of their choice.

Bounce It

One of the first things noted about the mixture of boric acid and silicone oil was that the product bounced. Roll the Silly Putty up in to a ball and drop it on the floor to see it bounce. You can also bounce the Silly Putty off a wall, table, street or school desk. Silly Putty will bounce even if it is not rolled up in to a ball. You will not, however, be able to predict where the putty will end up.

Carry Messages

Silly Putty has the power to pick up messages written in ink. This includes both black and colored inks. Roll your Silly Putty out flat, and press it down over your favorite newspaper comic strip. Lift it up to reveal the comic on the Silly Putty. Children can also press the Silly Putty over certain words to create a message to give to their friends. Messages are easily erased by folding the Silly Putty and mushing it back together.

Note: Silly Putty may not pick up messages in every newspaper due to changes that have been made in the printing process.

Basic Home Repairs

Silly Putty doesn't just have to be used for fun and entertainment. It also has practical uses around the home. For example, if you have a small leak under your bathroom sink, you can wrap the Silly Putty around the pipe to plug the leak. Kitchen chairs that have an uneven leg can be leveled out by adding Silly Putty to the bottom of the leg. Also, Silly Putty can fill in any small accident holes made in the walls of your home.

Cleaning

Silly Putty is actually brilliant at picking up lint. Roll the Silly Putty out flat and press it up against any piece of clothing that contains lint you need to remove. Quickly pull the Silly Putty away, and look in amazement at your lint-free clothing. This trick also works on other surfaces within your home, including computer screens and keyboards.

About the Author

Alicia Bodine has been a professional writer for six years. She has produced thousands of articles for online publications such as Demand Studios, Bright Hub, Associated Content and WiseGeek. Bodine is also the current cooking guru for LifeTips. She has received awards for being a top content producer.