How to Program a Bearcat Uniden BC248CLT Scanner

By Keith Perry ; Updated April 12, 2017
Scanners open a window to activities occurring your city.

The Bearcat Uniden BC248CLT scanner is an older scanner designed for fixed location use. The scanner scans multiple frequency ranges and receives the AM/FM radio. The BC248CLT is an ideal scanner for beginners or to keep as a spare for emergencies. Weather frequencies come programmed from the factory. Program up to 50 frequencies to scan at a rate of 12 channels per second. Program your scanner and listen in on your local police and fire departments.

Plug the AC adapter into the back of the scanner and into a wall electrical outlet. Screw the antenna into the receptacle on the back of the scanner (extend the antenna to full length for best reception).

Set the squelch level to allow signals to be heard by turning the squelch knob counterclockwise. Rotate the volume knob clockwise until you hear static. Slowly turn the squelch knob clockwise until the static noise disappears.

Start programming frequencies into the scanner by pressing the "Manual" button.

Press the up arrow or down arrow key until the channel you wish to program is visible on the display.

Use the numbers on the keypad to enter the frequency for the local transmitter you wish to receive.

Press the "E" key to complete the process of entering the frequency.

Repeat steps 3 through 6 for each additional frequency you wish to monitor.

Press the "Scan" key to start the scanning process. The scanner stops on a channel when it detects a signal strong enough to hear over the squelch setting. Two seconds after the signal stops, the scanning process resumes.

About the Author

Keith Perry has been an employee and contractor for several large companies in various information-technology jobs. He holds an executive Master of Business Administration from Jacksonville University with an undergraduate degree in computer science from University of North Florida. He began writing for Lotus Notes Advisor and Mobile Advisor publications in 1998.