How to Make My RC Boat Fast

By Jeff Slater ; Updated April 12, 2017
Your RC boat can cover water rapidly with a few choice upgrades.

Remote control (RC) boating offers modelers a relaxing RC experience while delivering a satisfying rush. These model boats can achieve speeds of 100 mph or more, and unlike helicopters or planes which require a minimum of four channels to attain controlled flight, RC boats need just two channels, throttle and left-right directional stability. This makes RC boating easily accessible, as most can drive a model boat on the first attempt. In the never ending quest for more speed, many hobbyists modify and tweak their boats to run as fast as possible.

Replace the stock factory propeller with a larger, more-efficient sport prop for your motor. The more water the prop can move the more thrust it will deliver. In addition, aftermarket props are typically made of high-strength lightweight materials, allowing them to spin faster and be more durable than many standard props.

Add extra down-force and stability to your boat with a rear spoiler. Spoilers become extremely effective at high speeds, or in rough conditions which can easily cause your boat to "porpoise" or bounce out of the water.

Connect a high-discharge lithium polymer battery on a brush-less setup for the ultimate in electric power. These batteries are designed to provide stable high-current power delivery at 35C (C ratings indicate the total sustained amps the battery can provide) rates or better, coaxing the most power possible out of the motor.

Install a slightly larger motor than stock to take your boat to the next level. A boat that has a .28 cubic-inch engine can typically accept a .35 motor without any balance or weight issues.

Things Needed

  • Sport propeller
  • Spoiler
  • High discharge batteries
  • Upgraded motor

About the Author

Jeff Slater has been a freelance writer since 2007 and was first published in the York University student newspaper "AfterWord." Currently based in Toronto, Slater regularly contributes technology and automotive news stories to He holds a bachelor's degree in computer science from Riverton University.