List of Hip-Hop Line Dances

By Shannon Lee
Line dancing isn't just for country-and-western dancers.

Upon hearing the phrase "line dancing," most people envision cowboy hats and senior citizens. However, there are many styles of dance other than country-and-western dancing that include traditional line dances in their repertoire. The hip-hop dance genre in particular has many popular line dances.

The Soulja Boy

The Soulja Boy line dance became wildly popular after the 2007 release of the song "Crank Dat" by the artist Soulja Boy. Although relatively simple in choreography, the line dance quickly gained popularity with young children in dance studios as well as young adults in nightclubs. It is performed by hopping alternatively to the left and right while making a "snapping" motion with the wrist, as well as a movement that is meant to signify flying when the lyric "Superman" is said during the chorus.

The DJ Casper Cha-Cha Slide

The Casper Cha-Cha Slide is one of those dances that everyone seems to recognize, yet no one knows from where. Performed to the song of the same name by DJ Casper, the lyrics to the song dictate the dance moves, just like those of the song/dance "The Wheels on the Bus" do, for example. This line dance requires everyone to slide from side to side, move backward, hop, then make three cha-cha movements, after which dancers are directed to change direction.

The Electric Slide

Perhaps one of the most famous urban line dances of all time, the Electric Slide is also one of the only official copyrighted line dances registered with the Library of Congress. As the name suggests, the dance does in fact include many slides but is mostly made up of a series of step-touches and grapevines, which are made more or less difficult depending on the formations of the dancers participating. The Electric Slide is greatly used in hip-hop dance, with rugged arm movements and chest pops often incorporated to enhance the urban dance feel.

The 1,2 Step

The 1,2 Step is derived from the most basic dance movement: the grapevine. However, after the song "1,2 Step" by the artists Ciara and Missy Elliott was released, the grapevine took on a distinctly hip-hop feel especially when performed to this song. The 1,2 Step follows the basis of the original grapevine movement, but instead of stepping with a flat foot, the steps of the grapevine are performed with the heel down and toes up. The arms are also often above the head and off to the side.

About the Author

Shannon Lee began her professional journalism career in 2009. Her reporting has appeared in "The Hudson Gazette" and her editing work in the "Redwood County Newspaper." Lee is also a professional dancer and owns one of the largest dance studios in her region. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts with a double-major in communication studies and journalism.