How to Use a Chakra to Make Genjutsu

By Johari Imani Murray ; Updated September 15, 2017

Genjutsu is one of three ninja combat techniques activated by hand seals to create illusions. In the Naruto manga series, ninjas with high intellectual prowess make genjutsu by extending their chakra flow through the cerebral nervous system of their opponents to control their minds’ chakra and as a result affect their five senses.

To create genjutsu enter the fictional ninja world of Naruto and assume a ninja identity. Control your chakra flow of energy in the cells of your body and of the mental and spiritual energy you have from training and experience in the Ninja Academy.

Choose the genjutsu mystical techniques to utilize in battle. Gauge your type and amount of chakra to use the elements of fire, wind, lightning, earth or water. Remember the hierarchy of elements, one being weaker than the previous and stronger than the next, and looping water back to fire.

If you don’t know which is your element, use the special elemental detecting paper from trees specially grown with chakra to make this determination. Saturate the paper with a portion of your chakra. The paper will tear in two if your element is wind, burn if it is fire, become wet if it is water, come apart if it is earth and crumple if it is lightning.

Create other elemental chakras by mixing your physical energy with your spiritual energy. A specific chakra will be formed depending on the ratio of this mix. Dominate the chakra flows in battles and through specially designed practices to best control large amounts of chakra.

Learn the 22 known genjutsu techniques to create illusions and six ranking codes for performance. Bring out and release the chakra energy from your cells and experience to make Genjutsu. Use special hand seals to activate the genjutsu.

About the Author

Originally from New York, Johari Imani Murray has been writing creative and critical pieces since 1992. Her work first appeared in the two-volume book, "Words & Pictures: Poems and Photo Essay," edited by Dr. Larry Spruill. She earned her Master of Arts in education from Columbia University and a Bachelor of Arts in English writing from Manhattanville College.