How to Troubleshoot AmpliTube iRig

By Simon Foden
Connect to your amp via your iPhone to access a range of new tones.

The Amplitube iRig from IK Multimedia is a musical instrument interface adapter that lets you plug your guitar into an amplifier via your iPod or iPod. The free Amplitube app enables you to access a range of emulated guitar sounds, effectively turning your iPod or iPad into a multi-effects unit. If the iRig isn’t working properly, troubleshoot it and the associated devices before ordering a replacement. You can eliminate any easy-to-fix problems before spending money.

Crackling or Intermittent Sound

Remove your instrument cable from the iRig 1/4-inch input jack.

Insert a brand-new instrument cable into the jack. A faulty guitar cable can create sounds similar to those of a faulty interface, namely crackling and hissing. Since your guitar cable experiences much more movement than the iRig adapter, it's more likely to experience wear and tear. By replacing the cable with a new one, you eliminate a faulty cable as a cause.

Slot a razor blade into the groove along the side of the iRig casing. Once you’ve established entry, slide the blade along the edge and gently pry the top half of the casing away from the bottom half.

Inspect the interior. If you spot any loose or completely disconnected wires, these are the most likely cause of intermittent sound.

Feedback

Press the “Home” button the iPhone or iPad.

Swipe to unlock the screen.

Press the “-” button to minimize the volume. When headphones are connected, this creates a feedback loop. If the volume of the iPhone or iPad and headphones are up, the output will feed back into the input, creating an unpleasant squealing sound.

Poor Sound Quality with Speakers

Press the “Home” button on your iPhone or iPad.

Swipe left to to right to unlock the screen.

Press “Setup” and turn off the “No Feedback” option. The “No Feedback” option limits the signal strength to avoid feedback when using headphones. If you are using speakers, this isn’t an issue. If you have switched from headphones to speakers and have noticed a dip in sound quality, this is the reason.

About the Author

Simon Foden has been a freelance writer and editor since 1999. He began his writing career after graduating with a Bachelors of Arts degree in music from Salford University. He has contributed to and written for various magazines including "K9 Magazine" and "Pet Friendly Magazine." He has also written for Dogmagazine.net.