How to Tie the Eternity Knot

By Michael Logan
Buddha's wisdom is the inspiration for the eternity knot.

The decorative eternity knot has roots in Buddhism as a symbol of Buddha's wisdom. This knot has a symmetric shape when completed and is easily placed anywhere on a rope or string. Knots may be grouped together or spaced apart as decoration or as a replacement for beads. A soft, flexible rope or string works better than a stiff rope. Practice this knot using a soft, 1/2-inch rope until you learn it before attempting to tie it in string.

Grasp the middle of the rope with your left thumb and forefinger and hold it. Grasp the rope 5 inches to the right with your right hand and bring the two points together with the right hand side on top. Hold the folded rope with your left hand thumb and forefinger. This makes a loop.

Grasp the rope with your right hand thumb and forefinger about 5 inches to the right and feed that point through the back of the loop so it protrudes as a second loop through the first. Pull the rope from the left side to tighten the first loop around the second loop.

Feed the right end of the rope through the front of the second loop and pull it through, making a third loop about 2 inches in diameter. Pull the rope on third loop to tighten the second loop. Pull the right side of the rope to size the third loop at about 1 1/2 inches.

Twist the third loop 1/2 turn counterclockwise with your right hand. Feed the right end of the rope into the twisted loop from behind and pull it all the way through.

Work the knot tight by pulling on last loop and the right end of the rope. The finished knot is symmetrical with two smaller portions on either side of a larger center.

Tip

After a little practice, it is easy to position this knot where you want it on the rope.

About the Author

Michael Logan is a writer, editor and web page designer. His professional background includes electrical, computer and test engineering, real estate investment, network engineering and management, programming and remodeling company owner. Logan has been writing professionally since he was first published in "Test & Measurement World" in 1989.