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How to Stitch an Indian Back Open Blouse

By Shellie Braeuner
Sari blouses are traditionally called choli.

Saris have two parts. The largest portion is the ghagra, a piece of fabric that wraps around the wearer’s lower body and drapes over the shoulders. The choli is a tight-fitting blouse with an open back that matches the ghagra. Often the fabric for a sari contains a portion to cut off and sew into the choli. Choli are tight fitting, and originally served to support the breasts. The open back may have a string tied across the shoulders to add support.

Lay the fabric out on the work surface. Pin the pattern to the fabric taking care to lay the pattern parallel to the selvage edge of the fabric. The pattern includes two of everything including front, back, sleeves, ties and bottom band. Cut out the pieces.

Mark the darts on the choli front pieces. Sew the darts with the sewing machine.

Sew the front and back together at the shoulders. Stitch the sleeve into the shoulder seam of the choli. Hem the sleeve bottom. Sew the sleeve and side seams.

Stitch bias tape around the neckline and back of the choli.

Sew the center front seam of the choli lining up the front darts.

Sew the two bottom band pieces together to form one long piece. Fold the band in half the long way with right sides together. Sew the edge to form a long tube. Turn the tube right side out.

Pin the band to the bottom of the choli, matching the seam in the center of the band and the center front seam. Stitch the band in place.

Fold the ties in half lengthwise with right side together. Sew to make two tubes and turn right side out. Stitch to the shoulders.

Warning

Measure your chest and bust size carefully to ensure a good fit.

About the Author

Based in Nashville, Shellie Braeuner has been writing articles since 1986 on topics including child rearing, entertainment, politics and home improvement. Her work has appeared in "The Tennessean" and "Borderlines" as well as a book from Simon & Schuster. Braeuner holds a Master of Education in developmental counseling from Vanderbilt University.