How to Record a Rap Song on Audacity

By Serm Murmson
It is easy to record a rap song at home.

Home recording technology is readily available, for very low prices. Much of the technology you need to record a rap song is even available for free. Audacity is a free software program that allows for high-quality sound recording on your computer. With the help of Audacity, your creative rap ideas can become a reality. When using Audacity, it is important to realize that much of the sound of modern rap comes from the use of samples, which Audacity is not equipped to handle as fluidly as some other software programs.

Preparing Your Song

Record or otherwise prepare the sound clips that will constitute your backing track. If you are using samples, make sure you have permission to use them. You may wish to do this in a different audio program, as Audacity was not designed for manipulating audio samples, but rather for recording and editing live sound. Commercial programs, such as Fruity Loops and Ableton Live, handle this task well.

Arrange your backing track so that it flows with your lyrics. If there is a chorus in your song, make sure that the backing track and the lyrical content are of appropriate length. Do the same for each verse. Check this by playing your backing track and rehearsing your lyrics. If you need to alter the length of a verse or chorus, do so by editing it down or adding another measure of the appropriate sample.

Connect a microphone to your computer if it is not already connected. You may wish to use an audio interface for better sound quality.

Recording in Audacity

Open Audacity.

Import your backing track by selecting "Import Audio" in the Project drop-down menu.

Select "Preferences" in the Edit drop-down menu.

Select the Audio I/O tab. Make sure "Play other tracks while recording new one" is checked. Click "OK."

Click the record button and record your lyrics. Do as many takes as necessary, and save your work often.

About the Author

Serm Murmson is a writer, thinker, musician and many other things. He has a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of Chicago. His concerns include such things as categories, language, descriptions, representation, criticism and labor. He has been writing professionally since 2008.