How to Make Quilt Templates

By Karen Ellis ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Quilt pattern
  • Copy paper
  • Poster board
  • Pencil
  • Scissors
  • Large envelope (optional)

Most quilt patterns are copied from magazines, books and the Internet. Many patterns come printed in "actual" size. However, others appear smaller and need to be enlarged by printing them on a copy machine. Quilt templates are used to create the fabric pieces that form a quilt block or other quilt pattern. Most quilts are made from just one or two different block patterns. This means that a minimal number of templates is required for making an entire quilt.

Trace the quilt pattern pieces from the book or magazine. Make sure you check all copyright issues when using a pattern from any printed material. Copy paper works well for tracing. If the quilt pattern is taken from an online site, simply print it out.

Cut the paper pattern out.

Draw around the pattern pieces onto poster board and cut out each piece. This will give you a thicker template, which will be needed as you make quilt blocks and use the same template numerous times.

Place the template on the wrong side of the selected fabric when you are ready to cut out your quilt pieces. Draw around the template with a pencil. Cut the fabric at the pencil marking.

Use a 10-by-13-inch envelope for filing your quilt templates. Write the name of the quilt block on the outside of the envelope and then store the templates inside. Add a picture of the finished quilt to the envelope. You will, no doubt, use this same pattern on another quilt.

Tip

Templates may also be constructed from transparency sheets. Trace the quilt pattern or photocopy it onto the transparency.

Warning

If you choose to copy patterns or sell a finished product from a book, magazine or any printed material, you must follow their copyright stipulations.

About the Author

Karen Ellis has been a full-time writer since 2006. She is an expert crafter, with more than 30 years of experience in knitting, chrocheting, quilting, sewing, scrapbooking and other arts. She is an expert gardener, with lifelong experience. Ellis has taken many classes in these subjects and taught classes, as well.