How to Make Fake Blood Without Corn Syrup

By Jasmine Acosta
Black-and-white Hollywood productions often used chocolate syrup as fake blood.

The fake blood available in stores is rather expensive. You can find recipes to make your own fake blood at home, but many of these recipes incorporate ultra-sticky corn syrup. This can make cleanup difficult and, the sticky stuff can even start to attract bugs. Avoid these problems and still create realistic special effects by using a corn syrup-free recipe for fake blood.

Edible Fake Blood Recipe 1

This blood recipe is good when you need to create blood splashes or other effects that require a large amount of blood.

Materials Needed

  • 1 package plain or red gelatin
  • 2 bottles of red food coloring
  • 1 tablespoon of green food coloring
  • 1 to 5 gallons of water, depending on desired consistency
  • Large bucket or container
  • Paint stirrer

First, prepare gelatin as directed by the package, adding twice the amount of water. Add food coloring, and mix, adding more water to change the consistency of the blood. However, keep in mind that the blood may not look realistic if it is too watery.

Edible Fake Blood Recipe 2

Use this blood recipe when you need to create large drips or splatters of blood. This mixture is thick, so you need to spoon it over the surfaces you want it on. A combination of red and green food coloring help create the brownish tinge of real blood.

Materials Needed

  • 2/3 cup Oriental cherry dipping sauce (can be found at grocery stores).
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1/2 teaspoon of red food coloring
  • 2 or 3 drops of green food coloring
  • Medium-size container with lid
  • Spoon

First, mix the dipping sauce with water until it is a slimy consistency. Then, add food coloring, stir and refrigerate in the medium-size container. Place the lid on tightly and take it out of the refrigerator when you need it.

Non-Edible Fake Blood Recipe 1

Use this blood recipe to create the look of smeared blood on skin. When dried, this recipe also works particularly well to create realistic dried blood. Although the mixture incorporates chocolate syrup, do not eat it because it also contains detergent. Remember to keep it out of reach of children and pets.

Materials Needed

  • 2/3 cup of chocolate syrup
  • 1/3 cup of concentrated liquid detergent
  • 4 to 6 teaspoons of red food coloring
  • Hair dryer (optional)
  • Container with lid
  • Spoon

First, mix the chocolate syrup with the detergent in the container. Add food coloring and mix until the color is evenly distributed. Cover the container and refrigerate until an hour before needed. Smear the blood directly on the skin. To create the look of dried blood, smear the blood where you need it first, and then dry it with the hair dryer.

Non-edible Fake Blood Recipe 2

Take extra precautions to keep this blood away from your mouth because it contains automobile water pump lubricant, which can be fatal if swallowed. Keep it out of reach of children and pets.

This blood also stains, so keep it away from clothing, and mix it in a container you do not plan to use again. This mixture is best used where you need blood dripping down objects or bubbling from a fountain. It has a long shelf life because it contains an antibacterial agent -- hand sanitizing gel. It also has the added benefit of looking like real blood.

Materials Needed

  • 4 tablespoons automobile water pump lubricant (can be found at auto parts and repair stores)
  • 19 ounces of water-based hair styling gel
  • 4 ounces of alcohol-based hand-sanitizing gel
  • 7 tablespoons red food coloring
  • 9 drops of blue food coloring
  • Water (enough to make a gallon after the other ingredients are added)
  • Gallon-size container with lid (preferably, a milk container)
  • Funnel

Using the funnel, pour the hair styling gel and the hand-sanitizing gel into the container. Add 1 quart of water and shake the container until the gel dissolves. Use the funnel to add the rest of the ingredients. Shake the container again until the food coloring is evenly distributed throughout the mixture.

About the Author

Jasmine Acosta is a writer and graphic designer currently living in Seattle. Her hobbies include sewing and paper craft. Currently, she is researching MFA programs in both screenwriting and creative writing.