How to Get Certified for Coin Grading

By Jill Stimson J.D. ; Updated October 17, 2017
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Coin collectors own important artifacts of historical significance. Coin collecting can be traced back thousands of years to the Roman Empire. "Numismatics" is the term for the study of coins and notes. Professionally certified numismatists receive specialized training allowing them to valuate and appraise coins. Coin graders can receive certification through the American Numismatic Association (ANA). Students learn about history, counterfeit coins and coin grading techniques. Per the Bureau of Labor Statistics, after obtaining a certificate, numismatists can work for museums as coin curators, become archivists collecting historically significant materials or work for auction houses.

Review the ANA Numismatic Diploma Program Information Sheet. You can find tuition and accreditation resources.

Apply for ANA membership. You can visit the ANA's website and apply for membership electronically. All students must first become ANA members before enrolling for a certificate program. ANA offers three membership tiers. Regular members pay an annual membership fee of $46, as of September 2011. ANA offers senior citizen discounts.

Enroll in the ANA's School of Numismatics Diploma Program. As of 2011, the ANA offered a tuition package program of $399.

Take the classes through the ANA's correspondence program. You can also take your classes in a classroom setting, or a combination of the two. The six courses should take two years to complete.

Register for the final exam after you complete your six seminars.

Take and pass a 200-question final exam to obtain a certification. You can take the exam at any school, local library, the ANA's headquarters in Colorado Springs or any ANA convention.

Tip

If you require more than two years to complete your courses, the ANA will give you additional time. You must have a valid reason, such as an unforeseen military deployment, illness or other extenuating circumstances.

Warning

If you fail the final exam twice in a row, the ANA will remove you from its program. You cannot reapply for at least a year after removal.

About the Author

Jill Stimson has worked in various property management positions in Maryland and Delaware. Stimson worked for the top three property management companies in the commercial industry and focuses her career on property building logistics and tenant relationships. She holds a Juris Doctor and a Bachelor of Science in psychology.