How to Do the Two Corks Party Trick

By Sylvia Cini
A cork

Sharing party tricks can be a way to make friends and connections in a new place. As every region has their own repertoire of well-known illusions, it can be rewarding to bring a new means of entertainment to the table. As with any cultural exchange, it is always in your best interest to be sensitive to local perceptions and customs when giving a demonstration.

Two Corks Trick

The cork would sit in the

Hold one cork in each hand so that the middle of the cork rests in the fold between your thumb and index finger. (The length of the cork should extend above your knuckles and below your palm.)

Inform your audience that the goal is to have the corks switch hands. The condition of this trick is that your index and pointer fingers must be in contact with the ends of the cork in the opposite hand at all times. (Your left index and left thumb will be touching the cork in your right hand and vice versa.)

Place your index finger and thumb on the ends of the cork in the opposite hand. Without removing that contact, try to pull the corks from one hand to the other. (This will not work, the corks will block each other.)

Allow your audience members to try to figure out the trick without further assistance. Most people will not be able to visually process the illusion and will be stuck.

The trick to this challenge is in the placement of your fingers on the corks. Place your left index finger on the bottom of the right cork, and your right thumb on the top of the left cork.

Place your right index so that it crosses over your left index finger. Place your left thumb so that is passes over your right thumb to touch the cork. You will be able to move your hands apart freely, the corks having switched hands.

Tip

Using long corks makes this trick easier to perform.

If you have small hands, this trick will be hard to perform with full-sized corks. You may substitute pen or marker caps to suit your needs.

Warning

If you are unsuccessful in performing this trick, do not try to force your hands apart. This can result in the corks flying lose.

About the Author

Sylvia Cini has written informative articles for parents and educators since 2009. Her articles appear on various websites. Cini has worked as a mentor, grief counselor, tutor, recreational leader and school volunteer coordinator. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Clark University of Worcester, Massachusetts.