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How to Build a Cheap & Easy Folding Sawhorse

By Richard Gaughan ; Updated September 26, 2017
Inexpensive sawhorse brackets are the start of functional, foldable woodworking stands.

Anyone working on projects requiring measuring, cutting, and assembling woodworking projects around the home will find a sawhorse nearly indispensable. If you spend hours every day with a plane or keyhole saw in hand, you’ll have handfuls of sawhorses and workbenches for every possible need. On the other hand, if you just need to trim a fence board every six months, you want the convenience of a sawhorse without having to spend a lot of money or dedicate a lot of space. An inexpensive folding sawhorse fits the bill.

Cut four 31-inch lengths of 2-by-4. Cut three from the 8-foot length and 1 from the 6-foot length.

Insert one 31-inch length into one of the bottom openings in the sawhorse bracket, up to the stop. Screw the bracket to the leg. Insert the other 31-inch leg in the other opening and screw in.

Repeat for the other bracket.

With the brackets folded, so the legs are parallel to each other, insert the remainder of the 6-foot length into the channel at the top of the brackets. If you’re working alone, hold the two bracket assemblies right next to each other and put the center of the crosspiece in the middle of the two open bracket tops.

Partially close the bracket tops by spreading the legs, but don’t spread them far enough to put pressure on the crosspiece. Slide the bracket assemblies away from the center of the crosspiece symmetrically, then open the legs completely so the crosspiece is pinched and held in place by the bracket tops.

When complete, fold the legs, which frees up the crosspiece, then you can store all the pieces in a very compact space.

Tip

You are trading convenience for sturdiness here. If you are going to do heavy-duty work for any length of time, invest in more sophisticated fixed bracket hardware. It won’t be foldable, but it will be sturdier.

About the Author

First published in 1998, Richard Gaughan has contributed to publications such as "Photonics Spectra," "The Scientist" and other magazines. He is the author of "Accidental Genius: The World's Greatest By-Chance Discoveries." Gaughan holds a Bachelor of Science in physics from the University of Chicago.