How do I Connect a Yamaha P-85 to an Amp?

By Robert Russell ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • 1/8-inch adapter
  • Instrument cable
  • Keyboard amplifier

The Yahama P-85 is a digital keyboard that is great for recording and practicing at home. It may be connected directly to computer for recording and it has small built-in speakers. The P-85 also has a headphone jack that allows you to practice without bothering your neighbors or family members. However, the small speakers are inadequate live performances. A keyboard amplifier is necessary if you are planning on using the P-85 for live performances.

Find the right amplifier for your musical needs. Keyboard amps come in different shape and sizes. If you are playing solo gigs in a small venue, then a small amplifier will work fine. However, if you are playing in a rock band, then your amplifier needs will be quite different. Try out several keyboard amps and read keyboard amp reviews.

Connect a regular instrument cable to a 1/8-inch adapter. Instrument cables are designed for 1/4-inch input jacks. To connect the P-85 to an amplifier, plug the instrument cable to the headphone jack on the piano. The headphone jack is 1/8 inch in diameter. This makes an adapter necessary. Attach the adapter to one end of the instrument cable and plug it into the headphone jack in the front of the P-85. Plug the other end of the instrument cable into the amplifier.

Set the volume low on the P-85 and on the amplifier. Adjust the volume of the P-85 with the master volume slider. Adjust the volume on the amplifier with the volume control knob. Turn the keyboard and the amplifier on. Slowly raise the volume on each to the appropriate level.

Experiment with the amplifier to get the right sound. The amp does more than make your keyboard louder, it also shapes and crafts the sound and tone of your keyboard. Experiment with the tone controls. Set the treble and bass at 12 o'clock and go from there.

About the Author

Robert Russell began writing online professionally in 2010. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy and is currently working on a book project exploring the relationship between art, entertainment and culture. He is the guitar player for the nationally touring cajun/zydeco band Creole Stomp. Russell travels with his laptop and writes many of his articles on the road between gigs.