Electric Guitar Facts

By Mark Orwell ; Updated September 15, 2017

Electric guitars comprise some of the most modern guitars available, and are also some of the more popular among amateur and professional musicians alike. The electric guitar is an instrument that was birthed from jazz music and has found its way into pop, rock, metal and many other genres. There are a few different types of electrical guitars to choose from, and each can produce a wide range of sounds

Function

Electric guitars work by converting the vibration of their strings into electrical currents, which are then turned into sound by an amplifier.

Types

There are a number of different types of electric guitars, including hollow-body, solid-body, and metal-body varieties, as well as acoustic-electric hybrids.

Identification

Electric guitars are made up of strings, a body, a neck, and a series of frets, and are hooked up to an amplifier via an electrical cable to produce sound.

Features

Electric guitars mostly feature six strings, though some are made with seven or 12 strings; which one a player chooses depends in part on the genre of music in which she specializes.

History

The electric guitar was first used during the big-band era of the 1930s and 1940s, and has figured in many musical genres since then, including rock and roll and the blues.

Manufacturers

There are many manufacturers of electric guitars; some of the most famous names include Fender, which sold the first commercially successful electric guitar; and Vox, which was one of the first to experiment with 12-string guitars and on-board effects.

Effects

In addition to the on-board effects that are sometimes built into the instrument itself, the music that is made from an electric guitar can be altered at the amplification stage to include colorations such as reverb and distortion.