The Best Way to Make Scented Candles

By Shailynn Krow
Beautifully scented candles for your home.

There is nothing better than the smell of a scented candle burning in your home. With nostalgia-inducing aromas of apple spice, Christmas trees and even fresh fruits, you can turn your home into a sensory wonderland. Making scented candles is an age-old craft that can easily be done at home. With the right tools, supplies and fragrances, you can fill your home with a wonderful scent that was crafted just by you.

Weigh out the appropriate amount of wax. It takes one pound of wax to fill a 20-ounce jar.

Pull out your wax-safe pot. On low heat, add your wax and melt it. Continue heating the wax until the temperature reaches between 170 and 180 degree Fahrenheit, as indicated by the reading on your wax-safe thermometer. Do not overheat your wax.

Prepare your containers. Set them on a sturdy surface where they cannot spill. Use your glue gun to secure your wick to the bottom of the jar. Pull the loose end of the wick up and over the lip of the jar; do not let the wick fall inside the jar.

Once the wax has reached its desired temperature and consistency, remove it from the heat. Add in one ounce of fragrance oil for every pound of wax, and stir to incorporate it throughout the wax.

Add the colored dye to your wax one drop at a time until the desired color has been achieved. Stir to fully incorporate the color.

Ensure your temperature is between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit. Slowly pour the wax mixture into your container. Hold the top of the wick to keep it from falling into the jar, and pour the wax slowly so it does not splash. Keep your wick centered so that it will be in the proper position when the candle dries.

Trim your wick to half an inch high after the wax has fully hardened.

Tip

You can find wax fragrance oils and wax dyes at craft stores.

About the Author

Shailynn Krow began writing professionally in 2002. She has contributed articles on food, weddings, travel, human resources/management and parenting to numerous online and offline publications. Krow holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and an Associate of Science in pastry arts from the International Culinary Institute of America.