How to Make a Breadbox

By Michael Straessle ; Updated April 12, 2017
Breadbox with a special touch

One thing that can set off the décor in the kitchen is a personalized breadbox. This is a project most woodworkers would likely enjoy doing. It requires a minimal amount of woodworking experience and is easy to assemble. Choose good hard lumber to get the most life out of the breadbox.

Place the three pieces of 9-by-18-by-¾-inch lumber on a worktable. Drill pilot holes with the 1/16-inch drill bit every 3 inches down one long edge of two of the pieces. Keep them within 3/8-inch from the edge. The pilot holes in the corners need to be 3/8-inch from both edges. The pieces are the front and the back of the breadbox.

Next, apply wood glue to the long edges of the piece without pilot holes. Place this piece between the other two and secure it with the finish nails. Clean up excess glue immediately with a damp cloth.

Place the two pieces of 9-by-10½-by-¾-inch lumber on the worktable. Drill pilot holes with the 1/16-inch drill bit every 3 inches on both of the 9-inch edges and one of the 10½-edges. Keep them within 3/8-inch from the edge. The pilot holes in the corners need to be 3/8-inch from both edges.

Apply glue to the outside edges of one end of the assembly from Step 2. Place one of the 9-by-10½-by-¾-inch pieces of lumber on the glue and secure it with the finish nails. Clean up excess glue immediately with a damp cloth. Repeat this on the other end of the breadbox.

Place the 11½-by-20½-by-¾-inch piece of lumber on the worktable. Measure in 1 inch from each end and make a mark on the edge of the lumber. Place the piano hinge on these marks and secure it with the brads supplied by the manufacturer. Next, place the piece on the breadbox and secure the hinge to the back of the box.

Set all the nails and fill them with wood putty. After it cures, sand it with the 100-grit sandpaper. Personalize the breadbox by stenciling a personal design or message. For information on stenciling, go to http://www.stencilease.com/howto.htm.

Things Needed

  • 3 pieces 9-by-18-by-¾-inch lumber
  • 2 pieces 9-by-10½-by-¾-inch lumber
  • 1 piece 11½-by-20½-by-¾-inch lumber
  • Variable speed drill
  • 1/16-inch drill bit
  • Wood glue
  • Hammer
  • 6d finish nails
  • Nail set
  • Damp cloth
  • Piano hinge, 19½-inches long
  • Wood putty
  • 100 grit sandpaper

Tip

Use a hardwood lumber, such as oak, for the most durable breadbox you can build.

Be sure to clean up excess glue immediately as this can affect the finish.

Warning

Do not leave power tools unattended in the presence of children.

Do not paint or stain the breadbox in an unventilated area.

About the Author

Michael Straessle has written professionally about the construction industry since 1988. He authored “What a Strange Little Man,” among other books, and his work has appeared in various online publications. Straessle earned a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in professional/technical writing.