Instructions to Make Tissue Paper Flowers

By Jennifer Elrod

Tissue paper flowers can be used for a number of occasions, and they are a great craft activity for kids and adults. Whether you use tissue paper flowers to decorate a bulletin board or to add a special touch to your Christmas tree, making these flowers is a craft that is both easy and fun. Layer the paper in different colors or use printed tissue paper to create a truly unique flower.

Gathering Materials and Creating a Work Space

You don't need a lot of expensive materials in order to make tissue paper flowers. Each flower takes only about 6 to 8 pieces of tissue paper and 1 pipe cleaner. Sheets of store-bought tissue paper are too big. So cut each sheet into several squares, and make each square the same measurement, from 7 inches by 7 inches to 9 inches by 9 inches.

Clear off a clean, flat surface and place the tissue paper squares and pipe cleaners in separate stacks. Green pipe cleaners mimic a green flower stem.

Creating the Tissue Paper Flowers

Pick up 6 to 8 squares of tissue paper and stack them on top of each other. Create an accordion fold by folding about 1/2 inch over then under until you have folded the entire stack of tissue paper. Get the sides as even as possible when you fold.

Wrap one end of a pipe cleaner around the middle of the folded tissue paper, and twist it shut. Start separating the layers of tissue paper and opening up the paper flower. Continue to open up the flower until you have a pretty, ball-shaped flower.

Making a Bouquet

You can create a bouquet of these beautiful flowers. If you do, don't be afraid to mix and match solids with prints. Seasonal tissue paper also looks good for holiday bouquets. They look cute in kid's rooms, too, especially if you put them in a glass vase filled with colored sand or pebbles.

About the Author

I'm an experienced teacher with a degree in Multidisciplinary Studies-Human Learning. I've worked with various grade levels at different educational facilities. My expertise includes: lesson planning, curriculum development, child development, educational practices and parent involvement.