How to Wrap a Cane

By Marysia Walcerz ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Mild soap
  • Wrapping material
  • Clean rags
  • Staple gun, tacks or small nails
  • Hammer
  • Glue
Metal accents are another common addition to canes.

Adding a wrap to a cane can accent a woodworking project. Canes are traditionally wrapped in leather; however, you can also use fabric, suede or other materials to add texture to your cane. Because all canes are different lengths and diameters, you will need to estimate the amount of wrapping material you will need for your specific cane. Also take into account the amount of wear and tear your cane will be getting when you choose a type of wrapping material.

Clean your cane thoroughly with soap and water. Dry it completely with a clean rag.

Cut a long, thin strip of the material you wish to wrap the cane with. You can easily cut excess material after you've wrapped the cane, so overestimate the length of the material. You can cut lighter material with scissors; however, heavier material will require a utility knife or other heavy-duty cutting device.

Soak stiff material, such as leather, in warm water for 15 to 20 minutes to soften it before working with it. Pat the material dry with a clean rag.

Attach the top of the strip of material to the head of the cane using staples, tacks or small nails. Fabric can generally be attached using staples; however, when working with leather or other thick materials, you will need to use a more industrial fastener, such as nails. Hammer the staples, tacks or nails so they lie flush against the cane. Wrap the material around the head several times to cover the fasteners.

Wrap the material firmly in a "candy-cane" pattern down the length of the cane. Pull each revolution tightly to ensure a secure wrap.

Secure the material to the bottom of the cane with staples, tacks or small nails. Wrap the material around the end of the cane several times to cover to the heads of the fasteners, and glue the material in place. Allow the glue to dry. Depending on the shape of your cane, you may need to secure the material in place as it dries by bracing it in a vice or by holding it securely with your hand.

Trim off any excess material.

About the Author

Marysia Walcerz has been writing since 2008. She has been published in several compilations of artistic and philosophical work, including "Gender: Theory in Practice" and "Retold Comics." Walcerz has a Bachelor of Arts in fine arts and philosophy from The Evergreen State College.