How to Sew Together Two Pieces of Quilt Batting

By Rebekah Martin

When making a large quilt, there is often the need to piece two pieces of batting together to form the size you need. You can sew the pieces together by hand or use your machine set on a zig-zag stitch. Sewing pieces will come in handy when using up scraps of batting, or piecing for a large or long project such as a king size quilt or a table runner.

Sewing by hand.

Pick out two pieces of quilt batting, preferably the same color to make for an even look.

Place the two straight, uncut edges together to give you a straight even seam.

Pick out hand-quilting thread to match the batting color.

Using a large needle, make large whip stitches the entire length of the seam.

Knot the thread when you reach the end of the batting seam.

Sewing with a Machine

Pick out two pieces of quilt batting, preferably the same color to make for an even look.

Place the two straight, uncut edges together to give you a straight even seam.

Thread your machine with thread that matches the batting color.

Set your machine to make large zig-zag stitches.

Sew up the seam between the two pieces.

Double back at the end and cut the thread.

Tip

When making a quilting project, try to sew as few pieces as possible to get the desired size. Use the tiny scraps of batting for smaller projects, instead of sewing together 15 pieces for a large quilt.

If you prefer not to have a straight-line seam, overlap your two pieces of batting about two inches, then cut in a large wavy pattern through the two layers. When you take away the scraps, the two pieces will fit together perfectly. A wavy line seam is often less noticeable than a straight seam.

Warning

Be careful, when hand sewing, to avoid pulling the thread too tight. This can cause a ridge. If it is too loose, however, you will have gaps. It may take sewing a few inches to get the tension correct.

When sewing with a machine, do not lay one layer on top of the other and sew a seam, like you normally would with fabric. This will cause a large bump all along your seam. Lay them side by side, keeping them touching, and sew using the zig-zag stitch.

About the Author

Rebekah Martin is a freelance writer and tutor. Her work has appeared in various online publications. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Mississippi College. Martin teaches her young children at home and also teaches Sunday School to preschoolers.