How to Sew a Pickstitch

By Nichelle Coleman

A pick stitch is a small, running hand stitch that you may see at the edge of the lapel and collar of a suit. This stitch is also commonly referred to as a half-backstitch. It is also a good stitch to use if you are sewing a zipper to a fragile or hard to handle fabric, such as wedding garments or evening wear. You can use this stitch in place of a final topstitch. This stitch is also used as a decorative stitch. It is usually used when the top part of the stitch should be seen.

Thread your needle, using the thread and fasten with a knot on the end.

Start from the bottom of your fabric or zipper. Fasten the thread on the underside of the fabric or zipper and push the needle through. If you are sewing a zipper, place your garment on a flat surface as you continue to sew.

Insert the needle back through the fabric or zipper, a thread or two behind the area where it first came through. Work from left to right with your thread and needle.

Push the needle through again about 1/4 inch ahead of the first stitch. Keep working from right to left. Continue along the length of the zipper or fabric while keeping the stitches even.

When you reach the end of your fabric or zipper, fasten a knot with the needle and thread.If you are sewing the stitch correctly, you will see a nice line of stitches that look like an even line of dots along your garment.

Tip

To achieve a straight line, add a row of hand basting stitches as a guideline.\nIf you are using thick material, ensure that you use thick thread.\nIf you are not sure about the stitch, before you work on your final project, practice using a test piece of fabric. \nEnsure that your stitches are not too far apart and that they are evenly placed.

About the Author

Nichelle Coleman began writing professionally in 2005 and has contributed to professional sites, including eHow.com and LIVESTRONG. With a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and a master's in technical communication, she helps software companies create training documentation. She specializes in technical, educational and business topics.