How to Paint Fruit With Acrylics

By Carl Hose ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Pencil
  • Acrylic paint
  • Canvas
  • Paintbrushes
  • Water
  • Fruit reference photo
Paint Fruit With Acrylics

Fruits and fruit bowls are popular fare for beginning and professional artists. As simple as fruit is, the wide range of presentations given to this subject matter by artists of all calibers is amazing. Even Monet and Van Gogh painted fruit. Artists today still give this simple subject matter its artistic due, and acrylic paint is a favorite medium for these works of art. Because of its smooth blending properties, acrylic paint is ideal.

Decide on the composition of your painting. Are you drawing fruit by itself or fruit in a bowl? What sort of overall presentation are you going for? Do you want an antique look or a more modern effect? Once you have the composition of your painting in mind, sketch it lightly with a pencil. Work from a reference photo if you want to. Don't worry about making your sketch perfect. Just get the general shape of the fruit pieces down the way you want them to be in your painting. Include a variety of fruits. Grapes, bananas, apples and a pear or two.

Use heavy strokes with your brush as you begin to apply the colors to your fruit. Once you've added the darker strokes of color, wet your brush and drag it through the darker paint applications. This will pull the color across the canvas and thin it out, giving your fruit light effects.

Add dimension to your fruit pieces by utilizing different stroke directions. Swirl your brush as you apply a mix of dark purple and black paints to your grapes. Add a little brown paint around the bottom edge of some of the grapes to add dimension and shadow.

Wipe a damp brush back and forth along the middle curve of one or two of your bananas to showcase the curves and add depth to the fruit. Apply little dabs of brown to add a realistic ripening effect.

Use a faded black or brown back drop to allow the fruit to stand out. The focus of this painting should be the fruit. Adding anything to the background is likely to detract from the fruit.

About the Author

Carl Hose is the author of the anthology "Dead Horizon" and the the zombie novella "Dead Rising." His work has appeared in "Cold Storage," "Butcher Knives and Body Counts," "Writer's Journal," and "Lighthouse Digest.". He is editor of the "Dark Light" anthology to benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities.