How to Paint a Fireplace Screen

By Ryan Lawrence

Things Needed

  • Screwdriver
  • Water-based cleanser with degreasing capabilities
  • Coarse plastic brush
  • Water hose
  • Fabric dropcloth
  • Heat-resistant, galvanized metal spray etching primer
  • High-temperature spray appliance paint
Choose a paint suited to high temperatures.

If you are planning to paint your fireplace screen, you'll contend with a few complications. First, because metallic surfaces are nonporous, they are not ideal for paint adhesion and must be conditioned with a special type of primer that will abrade the surface to allow paint to stick. In addition, choose a specific type of paint suited to stand up to high temperatures, or the finish will warp, or even melt away, over time.

Remove the fireplace screen, using a screwdriver. Take the screen outdoors or into a well-ventilated area like an open garage.

Scrub the fireplace screen clean, using a coarse plastic brush and a water-based cleanser of your choice. Ensure the cleanser has degreasing capabilities. Rinse the screen with a water hose and allow it to dry.

Place the screen on top of a dropcloth.

Spray a coat of heat-resistant, galvanized metal spray etching primer onto one side of the screen. Wait one hour, and turn the screen over and spray the other side. Wait four hours for the screen to dry.

Apply a coat of high-temperature spray appliance paint just as you did the primer. Reinstall the screen, but wait a full day before using the fireplace.

Warning

Do not paint over a fireplace screen unless it has been coated with a heat-resistant, galvanized metal spray etching primer first, or the finish will fail.

Do not use an ordinary acrylic or latex paint on a fireplace screen; the paint will peel.

Wear a dust mask.

About the Author

Ryan Lawrence is a freelance writer based in Boulder, Colorado. He has been writing professionally since 1999. He has 10 years of experience as a professional painting contractor. Lawrence writes for High Class Blogs and Yodle. He has a bachelor's degree in journalism and public relations with a minor in history from the University of Oklahoma.