How to Make Wire Rap Rings

By Marge Burkell
Wire gauge influences the finished look of wire wrapped rings.

Wire wrapped rings make a nice accessory for anyone’s wardrobe. They are easy, inexpensive and can be made to match every outfit in your closet. Plus, they're gender neutral; the beads and wire color you select will determine whether the rings are feminine or masculine. Once you gain some experience working with 20-gauge wire, heavier, 18-gauge wire is a good choice for a more masculine look.

Thread the 20 mm coin bead onto the 20-gauge wire until it is approximately halfway. Pinch the wire away from the face of the bead so that they are running parallel, away from the front of the bead.

Slip your coin bead-threaded wire onto a ring mandrel to one size larger than you want the ring. Wrap the ends of the wire around the ring mandrel in opposite directions making sure the wraps are going underneath the bead from both the top and bottom and that they hold at the size you started. Wrap them about three times on each side, or six wraps in all. Bring the bottom wire down and the top wire down perpendicular to the coin bead, keeping the wire snug to the bead.

Remove ring from mandrel. Wrap cut end of wire on one side of the bead up, around, and down covering the wire strands of the ring band directly beside the bead, pulling snugly while wrapping, making three to four passes around the band. Repeat with other side of bead.

Clip excess wire close to ring band. Crimp wire end with crimping tool or chain-nose pliers to flatten the wire slightly to prevent the end of the wire from poking the wearer or snagging clothing.

Tip

Instead of passing initial wire wraps behind the bead, they may encircle the bead for a different finished look when the bead is thick enough to support the thickness of the wraps.

About the Author

Marge Burkell is a professional artist that has been writing since 1985. Specializing in home and garden, quilting and crafts, her work has appeared in "Quilting Today," "Art to Wear" and "Craft & Needlework" as well as her own line of sewing patterns. Burkell authors multiple blogs and has written for iVillage, among other Internet sites.