How to Make Romeo and Juliet Masquerade Masks

By Daniel Ketchum ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Photoshop
  • Thick printer paper
  • String elastic
  • Scissors
  • Hole punch

If you plan on attending a street fair or other medieval festival with your significant other in the near future, then dressing up as Shakespeare’s doomed young lovers might be a perfect costume idea for you. You might also like to create an unusual Halloween costume this October 31 using this costume theme. Either way, making your own Romeo and Juliet masks is a fun and simple project. Just follow the steps below to get it done.

Go to Google, switch to the "Image" search function, and search for “fine art portraits.” Since this is something for your personal use, and not something you intend to sell, you don’t have to worry about copyright. Or go directly to an online art gallery, such as the CGFA, and search.

Find a portrait of a young woman or girl who looks like she would be a good Juliet. The portrait needs to be facing directly forward. Right-click and save the image to your computer documents folder.

Use a ruler to measure the face of the person who will wear the mask. You want to know, in inches, the width and height of the face.

Open the image in Photoshop. Go to the "Tools" panel, and using the "Polygonal Selection" tool, select the face part of the image. Go to "Image," and select "Crop."

Go to "Image," and click "Image Size." Change the scale to inches, and change the height and width numbers to match those you got from the face. Then add 10 percent.

Print out the face. Now use a pair of scissors to cut it out from the surrounding paper. Also remember to cut out the eyes.

Use a small hole-punch to make two small holes on the sides. Run a piece of elastic string through these holes, tie a knot on the inside of each, and there you have it. A Juliet mask you can keep on by using the elastic string. Now just follow the same steps to produce the Romeo mask.

About the Author

Daniel Ketchum holds a Bachelor of Arts from East Carolina University where he also attended graduate school. Later, he taught history and humanities. Ketchum is experienced in 2D and 3D graphic programs, including Photoshop, Poser and Hexagon and primarily writes on these topics. He is a contributor to sites like Renderosity and Animotions.