How to Make Money Roses

By Julie Elle

Money makes a much appreciated gift for occasions such as weddings and graduation open houses. Many gift givers, however, find the practice of simply stuffing money into a card too impersonal and just not as much fun as other splashier gifts. Giving money as a gift does not have to be boring. Turn the cash into a bouquet of money roses.

Decide how much money you plan to give and decide on how many money roses you'd like to make. You'll need one bill for each rose. Since you are really going all out to make your gift special, you should head to the bank and get a stack of brand new bills. The finished product will look much nicer than one comprised of old and worn bills.

Lay the bill in front of you on a flat surface. Note that whatever side of the bill is facing the bottom will be the side that shows on your final money rose, so be sure to plan ahead.

Start at the right side of the bill. Gently bring the bottom corner of the bill toward the top of the bill to form a right angle without making a crease in the bill. The bottom facing side of the bill will now appear in the shape of a triangle. Grasp the bottom corner of this triangle between your thumb and pointer finger and begin rolling the bill into the shape of a rose, moving from the right to the left.

Let the money rose take shape as you continue to hold the bottom of the bill tightly between your thumb and pointer fingers. Once you've rolled the entire bill, you can experiment with the shape of the money rose by tugging the edges and poking the center. Continue tugging and poking until the money rose assumes the look you would like.

Use floral tape to secure the bottom of each rose. Be sure that the tape is just sticky enough to hold the shape of the rose. Using overly sticky tape could damage the bills.

Attach a floral stem to the bottom of each rose by securing it with more floral tape.

Bundle all of your money roses together to form a bouquet. Place them in a vase or wrap them with a ribbon or tissue paper to present them to the recipient.

Warning

Be sure that your money roses do not cause harm to the bills you use so as to remain in keeping with federal laws that govern currency.

About the Author

Julie Elle's diverse writing portfolio includes product descriptions, marketing copy, newsletters, and web content for private clients on numerous topics such as home decorating, holidays and celebrations, and personal finance. Elle has been writing for Demand Studios since 2007. Elle holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Michigan.