How to Make Fund Jars

By Rowan Wood
Use jars with lids you can easily remove for saving money.

Using fund jars to collect spare change can be an effective way to budget and save money. Unlike saving money in a bank account, keeping money in jars can give a visual idea as to how much money you have, how much money you've spent and how much money you need to save. Teaching children to save and budget their allowances is very effective when using fund jars, especially when they can personalize the jars themselves.

Clean out a glass or plastic jar with a matching lid. Make sure it is thoroughly clean and dry. Remove the label from the jar. Don't worry if you can't remove all of the label or glue, as you will be putting a new label on the side of the jar.

Cut a slot in the center of the lid with your scissors big enough for a quarter or 50-cent piece to fit through. This may take some time and effort, depending on what the lid is made of. Omit this step if you want to twist off the lid to put money in the jar instead.

Use your scissors to cut out a label from construction paper. Make the label long enough to wrap all around the jar, or cut it into a shape you like. Glue it to the side of the jar. Write the name of your fund jar on the construction paper. Some examples of good names are: "My Savings," "Shopping Money" or "Rainy Day Fund." If you are saving for something specific, write it in your jar name or draw it on your label.

Decorate your fund jar with paint, glitter and stickers. Cut out images of things that inspire you to save your money from magazines and glue them to the side of the jar. Take a piece of cloth larger than the size of the lid and secure it to the lid with string or an elastic band. Make sure to cut a slit in the cloth if you have a slot in the lid so money can go through.

Tip

Use an oatmeal container or a container with a pull-off plastic lid if you do not want to use glass jars.

Decorate your jars with more stuff like pipe cleaners, googly eyes and glow-in-the-dark paint.

Warning

Be careful when cutting the slot in the lid with scissors. Do not let children cut a slot in the lid with scissors.

About the Author

Rowan Wood began writing various forms of fiction and nonfiction over 20 years ago. Wood has had editorials published in the local "Times" newspaper and has had work featured in magazines like "PC Zone" and "WebUser Magazine." Wood specializes in fiction writing, visual art, film, crafting and game design.