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How to Make Egyptian Costumes

By Andrea Hermitt
Make Egyptian Costumes

Egyptian costumes are great to use for Halloween costumes. They are also striking for group costumes for costume parties and for theater performances. While not quite authentic, they look realistic, and anyone who can sew either by machine or by hand can create these fun to wear costumes.

Cut a simple tunic pattern from the white fabric. To do this, measure from floor to shoulders as well as from elbow to elbow for width with your arms outstretched. Fold the fabric in half and cut a rectangle with the width of the fabric on the fold. You will end up with a piece of fabric that is almost two body lengths long.

Cut the neck hole into the fabric by folding the material in half and finding the center. Cut a half circle big enough for the neck. Then cut a 3-inch slit down the back of the tunic.

Sew the sides of the tunic, leaving room for arm holes and also slits on the bottom of each side. Hem the bottom and arm holes of the tunic. You can add an eyehook set to close the neck after putting it on.

Use the stiff shiny fabric to cut a large circle big enough to reach from the edge of one shoulder to the other. Cut a second circle in the center for the neck, and then cut this disk shape from the center to the edge to create an opening.

Make fake Egyptian jewelry using the same metallic fabric. Cut 6-inch-wide cuff bracelets to place on each wrist. Use the same fabric to make a headband and other Egyptian jewelry such as the belt and apron for the man. Use strips of this fabric to add embellishments to the female tunic.

Finish the costume with embellishments. Use the glitter fabric paint to decorate the jewelry made from the shiny fabric. Use cord or an eyehook to help you secure the items in place.

Wear a black wig with this costume along with black eyeliner that extends beyond the outside corner of the eye.

Tip

You can use jewelry on top of the wig. You can use a simple dress in place of the tunic and just add the embellishments.

Warning

Don't put eye makeup on children as their skin may be sensitive.

About the Author

Andrea Hermitt is an artist and writer who loves to research and write about new things. She's been a content writer since 2000, contributing to Families.com, the blog Notes From A Homeschooling Mom and other online publications. Hermitt has a Bachelor of Arts in fine art and English from the State University of New York at Albany.