How to Make Cuff Bracelets From Fabric & Lace

By Rose Brown
Fabric lace of all types can be used to make cuff bracelets.

Cuff bracelets fit snugly on the wrist and, unlike bangles or chains, do not shift around. While they are commonly made from metals, beads, resin and even wood, some enchanting cuff bracelets are made of unexpected materials like fabric and lace. Because they are available in an assortment of colors, patterns and textures, fabric and lace are an ideal bracelet-crafting material. These fabric and lace bracelets make great handmade gifts for bridesmaids from a crafty bride.

Wrap measuring tape around your wrist to measure your wrist circumference.

Cut one strip of fabric and one strip of lace long enough to fit around your wrist and 3 inches wide. Stack the lace strip on the fabric strip.

Flip the fabric over so the lace-embellished side is facing down. Turn the edges over ΒΌ inch along the top and bottom of the cuff and press with a hot iron.Turn and press the cuff ends. Hem all folded edges in place by sewing with a needle and thread.

Flip the fabric back over so it is right side up. Create a clasp for the cuff with a button and a small elastic loop. Sew a button on one end. Cut a portion of elastic long enough to make a loop that fits snugly over the button, and sew it on the other end.

Embellish the fabric and lace cuff with beads, charms, sequins, tiny bells or other trinkets by hand sewing them onto the outside of the cuff with a needle and thread.

Tip

Make bracelets with a variety of fabrics, such as cotton, denim, jersey, and canvas.

Experiment with the positioning of the lace on the fabric; bunch it up, arrange it in a zigzag pattern or use it as edging.

For a more funky look, leave the edges of the fabric cuff raw and slightly frayed, rather than hemming them.

Use thread that contrasts with the colors of the fabric and lace for a dynamic design.

Instead of making a clasp with a button and a loop of elastic, use metal snaps or Velcro.

About the Author

Rose Brown began writing professionally in 2003. Her articles have appeared in such Montana-based publications as "The Tributary" and "Edible Bozeman." She earned a bachelor's degree in literature from the University of California at San Diego, and a master's degree in English from Montana State University. Brown has been a professional florist since 1997.