How to Make Corn Heating Pillows

By Gloria Hutson

One of the best things about a corn-heating pillow is the pad's mobility. It heats in a microwave and does not need an electrical outlet. You can take it anywhere in the house. The fill corn for the heating pillow requires feed or seed corn that can be located at feed supply stores. Materials to use for the cover vary and include flannel, denim and terrycloth.

Fold the fabric in half, right sides together, and lay it flat on your work surface.

Measure and cut the material 6 inches wide and 13 inches long. This forms a slender, elongated pouch to hold the corn.

Stitch the pouch together along the bottom edge and the sides using a 1/4-inch seam. Leave the top edge open. From the first seam move over another 1/4 inch and sew along the same sides and bottom. To add strength, stitch a second seam 1/2 inch from the edge of the fabric. Use back-and-forth stitching at each end of the seams to prevent the seams from coming open.

Turn the fabric right side out and add corn to fill the pillow halfway.

Fold the open edges under and stitch it closed. Move the corn away from the needle area of the machine and sew straight across the edge.

Cut two pieces of fabric that are 1/2-inch larger on all sides than the original ones. Make a second pouch, using the same steps and leaving one short end open. Add hook-and-loop tape to the open end.

Slide the corn pillow into the second case and close the hook-and-loop tape. Remove this case as need for washing.

Tip

Adjust the dimensions and make a square corn-heating pillow.

Warm the corn-heating pillow in the microwave for about three minutes on high. Check the pad’s warmth at one-minute intervals, as some microwaves get hotter than others do and three-minutes may be too long.

Warning

Store the pillow in a dry place and do not wash the corn-filled pouch. The corn may mildew and mold if it becomes wet. Wipe the pouch with a damp rag and allow to thoroughly dry. Keep the outer case on the pouch, remove and wash as needed.

About the Author

Gloria Hutson lives in Salem, Mo. She has been writing articles for various websites since 2009. She maintains two blogs that cover craft ideas and genealogical research. She holds a Master of Science degree in justice and security administration from the University of Phoenix and a bachelor’s degree in history from Missouri University of Science and Technology.