How to Make a Template for Folding Books

By Paul Jeter
Make your own little notebook.

You can create instant books from one sheet of paper. it takes three folds and one cut to make a small, eight-page book for sketching, scrap booking or notes. Scrapbook paper with a pattern works well and gives added flair to the finished book. Once you finish, number the pages and unfold it until it's a piece of paper again. You'll have created a template for other instant books. You can use the templates over and over to create a lot more books.

Make the first fold. Fold the piece of paper in half so the top edge meets the bottom. Using a portrait layout, the resulting book will have the dimensions of a book. For a long, skinny book, rotate the paper.

Fold it in half again, so the top meets the bottom.

Fold it in half again. This time, fold the left side over the right until the edges meet.

Unfold the last two steps. Align the piece of paper so the fold is on the bottom and four rectangles created by the folds are visible.

Cut a slit along the center fold line, using scissors, until it meets the perpendicular fold line.

Unfold the piece of paper completely. Align the slit you created so it's horizontal on the table.

Fold the bottom up and flip up the book until it stands on its edges. Hold both sides and push the book inward. It will look like a plus sign.

Fold the left side down, then the right, then the top. Flatten all folds until you have your eight-page book. Flip through the pages.

Label the front of the book. Do the same for the back. Number the pages. Then unfold your book completely. Trace each fold line. Use a dashed line for the line that you cut. This is your template. Photocopy or scan and print to create copies. Keep this original in a safe place for reuse later.

Tip

A staple in the middle will hold your book together.

You can cut the folds to create more pages.

Create a thicker book by stacking several smaller books together.

Make a simple cover using card stock.

Warning

Paper cuts occur when you drag your finger over the edge of a piece of paper. Minimize this by using a little bit of moisturizer on your hands before handling the paper.

About the Author

Paul Jeter has been a writer since 1990. He tackled writing in high school and college with a focus on poetry. In 2009 he finished his first novel and screenplay. His work has been published in "Reproduce and Revolt." He has a Bachelor of Fine Arts in art and art history.